Construction defects finally repaired at Florida condo complex

Seven years have gone by since repairs began on an upscale Florida condominium complex. But the Orlando Sentinel reports that the fixes have finally been completed at the problem-plagued Hamptons at MetroWest.

The construction defects at the condo complex racked up “millions of dollars in damage, hundreds of code violations and millions of dollars in fines from the city,” the newspaper reports.

According to a recent Sentinel article, the defects at the condo complex included mold and mildew, crumbling foundations, and water damage that rotted walls and porch railings and split ceilings. Windows and sliding glass doors in the multi-colored condo units were improperly installed and nails popped out of walls.

The long list of problems was so bad that a judge declared the 700-unit facility “unfit for human habitation.”

An attorney for the Hamptons says “all the repairs have been made” and the complex has been inspected and issued a certificate of compliance by the city.

The condo owners association has spent more than $22 million on the repairs, the article stated.

Back in 2010, more than half of Hamptons condos were in foreclosure and only 81 property owners actually lived at the southwest Orlando complex. Today, most of the units at the 70-acre site are occupied.

Repairs began in 2012 after the condo association had filed a construction defects lawsuit against the builders, condo converters (the complex originally consisted of high-end apartments) and other companies that had been part of the project.

The completed repairs and resurgent occupancy rate make it clear that perseverance in construction defects disputes can pay off in the long run.